NAGT > Publications > JGE > JGE Editor Search

NAGT Announces Search for Journal of Geoscience Education Editor

The National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) is seeking a new Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Geoscience Education (JGE). After six years of exemplary service, JGE Editor Kristen St. John, who has led the journal since 2010, announced this spring that she would step down in late 2017. David McConnell, Vice President of NAGT, will lead the search committee.

The Journal of Geoscience Education (JGE) is the premier peer-reviewed publication for geoscience education research at the undergraduate and pre-college levels. JGE is the publication of record for NAGT, and serves as the only international forum for the publication of research concerning the pedagogy, assessment, and philosophy of teaching and learning about the geosciences. JGE is published four times per year in February, May, August and November. Article types include Editorials, Commentaries, Papers on Curriculum & Instruction, Papers on Research, and Literature Reviews.

NAGT is a professional society committed to advancing geoscience education research, outreach and classroom curricula at all levels in academia and in the general public. As such, we seek an individual qualified to act as a strong advocate for both Association activities and priorities as well as the intellectual growth of the Journal and the research field of geoscience education.

In overseeing the journal, the Editor-in-Chief is responsible for its ability to support robust geoscience education research and its use in all aspects of teaching and learning about the Earth. The Editor takes the lead on maintaining a high-quality peer reviewed publication that responds to the needs and interests of NAGT, the geoscience education research communities, and the dynamic landscape of scientific publishing and communications. We seek an editor who will work with us to increase the impact, stature, influence, reach, and visibility of the journal.

The successful candidate will work with the Executive Committee to select a publishing partner during the first year of their term. Additionally, the Editor will be expected to manage the efforts of 20 Associate Editors, coordinating the timely completion of manuscript reviews and revisions. The Editor should also be knowledgeable of the production, printing, fulfillment, and distribution processes common to print and electronic journals, and be able to advise the Executive Committee on developments and opportunities that could be especially beneficial to JGE and the Association. The Editor should be available to attend face-to-face meetings of the Executive Committee and Council, the Award's luncheon at the Geological Society of America annual meeting, as well as virtual meetings of the Executive Committee and Council, and other activities as required to further special initiatives on behalf of JGE and NAGT.

Duties of the Editor-in-Chief include

  • Overseeing the development of each issue of JGE, including
    • Making guiding decisions about content and selecting themes for issues
    • Managing the peer-review and decision process for all manuscripts submitted to JGE
    • Writing or soliciting an editorial for each issue
    • Reviewing the layout for each issue prior to press.
  • Leading the editorial team
    • Recruiting and appointing editors and associate editors for research and curriculum & instruction
    • Maintaining a high level of interaction and knowledge within the group of editors (this is currently facilitated by an annual editors meeting at GSA, as well as through virtual communications)
    • Managing the flow of manuscripts to editors
    • Serving as the point person for technical questions from authors and reviewers
  • Playing a leadership role in NAGT's Geoscience Education Research Division to maintain a healthy flow of research articles
  • Leading the process to select JGE's annual Best Paper and Best Reviewer Awards
  • Serving as an ex officio member of the Executive Committee to maximize the success of the journal and its support for the NAGT mission.
  • Working with the Executive Office and Treasurer to recommend the annual budget, ensure appropriate publication tools and contracts, and other business affairs.

We anticipate that the successful candidate will be an active member of the geoscience education community with broad and diverse connections. He or she should have broad interests in geoscience education, excellent communication and organizational skills, the ability to work with a wide variety of people, and experience that will allow him or her to make decisions that will uphold the quality of the journal and the effectiveness of the publication process. The editor should have enthusiasm for JGE and its role in the geoscience community, the ability to engage with that community, and commitment to devote the time and effort to make the journal successful.

The application process

Deadline for expressing interest: March 31, 2017

Applications received by March 31 will be evaluated by the search committee. Requests for additional information, including a proposal for how the duties of the Editor-in-Chief will be incorporated into the existing workload with support from the home institution, will be made to qualified applicants by April 14.

Interviews for finalists will be conducted at the Earth Educators' Rendezvous, July 17-21, 2017, in Albuquerque, NM. The Association will negotiate a final plan regarding administrative support, travel support, telephone and Internet access, and other basic infrastructure in collaboration with the successful candidate for the ultimate establishment of the Editorship.

An appointment will be made shortly thereafter, and apprenticeship with the current Editor-in-Chief will begin immediately.

The new Editor-in-Chief will assume responsibility for the journal in January, 2018.

If you have any questions, contact Erica Zweifel, the Assistant Director of NAGT, at ezweifel@carleton.edu

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