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Drainage Basins Field Lab part of Field Trip Collection
Drainage Basins Field Lab: Jeff Marshall, Cal Poly Pomona University, Geological Sciences Dept. Intended Audience: Undergraduate course in geomorphology. Location: San Gabriel Mountains foothills, near Cal Poly ...

South Carolina Studies: Bringing the Geologic Time Scale Down to Earth in the Students' Backyard part of Field Trip Collection
South Carolina Studies - Bringing the Geologic Time Scale Down to Earth in the Students' Backyard: John R. Wagner, Clemson University Intended Audience: This exercise is suitable for the general public, though ...

Cattaraugus Creek Characteristics part of Field Trip Collection
Cattaraugus Creek Characteristics: Kevin Williams, Buffalo State College Intended Audience: Undergraduate course in geomorphology, this activity relates to the fluvial geomorph aspect. Location: I use this activity ...

River Rock Identification part of Field Trip Collection
River Rock Identification: Laura Triplett, Gustavus Adolphus College Intended Audience: I use this in an upper-level geomorphology course that is required for geology and environmental studies majors, so many of ...

Rainbow Basin, CA Mapping Project part of Field Trip Collection
Joan E. Fryxell, California State University, San Bernardino Intended Audience: This is an introductory geological mapping course that is required of all BA and BS majors. Location: Rainbow Basin, which is just ...

Stream Terraces part of Field Trip Collection
Stream Terraces: Donald T. Rodbell, Union College Intended Audience: Undergraduate course in geomorphology. Location: Stream terraces along a segment of the Plotterkill, a second order tributary of the Mohawk ...

Physical Geology: Idaho Field Trip part of Field Trip Collection
Physical Geology - Idaho Field Trip: Simon Kattenhorn, University of Idaho Our trip begins and ends in Moscow, Idaho, and covers the geological history of the area dating back to around 2 billion years ago. The ...

Introduction to the Black Canyon City Landslide part of Field Trip Collection
On this one day field trip, students will be exposed to some general introductory field methods by examining an active landslide. They will examine the relative ages of the units involved as well as identify the types of materials involved (bentonite, basalt, colluvium and alluvium). They will make an assessment as to what type of motion is occurring as well as a prediction for what types of hazards this may pose to the surrounding community.

Hydrogeology Field Investigation at the Confluence of the Snake River and Deer Creek, Summit County Colorado part of Field Trip Collection
Hydrogeology Field Investigation at the Confluence of the Snake River and Deer Creek Annabelle Foos Geology and Environmental Science Department The University of Akron Akron Ohio 44325-4101 Intended Audience: ...

Paleoclimate Reconstruction: Walker Lake-Bloody Canyon Moraines of Mono Basin, California part of Field Trip Collection
In this activity students map and describe glacial geomorphic features related to Quaternary glaciations in the Sierra Nevada of central California. In this region, multiple sets of glacial moraines and corresponding bogs and lakes are evidence of various advances during the Pleistocene. With time, glacial features are modified by erosional processes resulting in morphological changes that we can use to relatively date the various features. Using cross-cutting relationships, moraine morphology, boulder description/counting, and various other relative dating techniques students will "date" the moraines. In this locality there are three main moraine crests that are well-preserved and available for students to hike along and gather data (classified as Tioga-Tenaya, Tahoe, and Mono Basin moraines). At a locality along each of the three different moraine crests, students will observe the boulders along the ridge crest (within ~5m of the crest) within a known area. The students will record the number of boulders, the degree of weathering of the boulders, the lithology, the size (~diameter), roundness, presence of lichen (describe), and the presence of striations on each boulder. They will also note the style and amount of vegetation on the moraine and soil characteristics (amount of gruss around boulders?) The students should make a table in their field notebooks so that it is easy to compile the data at the end of the day. Generally students work in groups of 2 or 3. Since many of these observations are somewhat qualitative it works well for them to be able to discuss their thoughts while gathering data. It is helpful to use a few boulders as examples to set some ground rules before starting the activity รข this will help the class be the same page with regard to the techniques.

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