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AGI Accepting Applications for 2012 Award for Excellence in Earth Science Teaching

published Oct 20, 2011 4:45pm

Alexandria, VA - Does someone you know teach earth science to students between kindergarten and eighth grade? Do they excel in their teaching through leadership and innovation, bringing new ideas and approaches to teaching about our planet? If so, they may be eligible for the Edward C. Roy Award for Excellence in K-8 Earth Science Teaching.

Given annually, this award recognizes one classroom teacher nationwide for his or her leadership and innovation in earth science education. The winner will receive a prize of $2,500 and an additional travel grant of $1,000 to attend the 2012 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Annual Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana, 29 March through 1 April 2011. To be eligible, applications must be postmarked by 10 January 2012.

The award is named in honor of Dr. Edward C. Roy, Jr., who was a strong and dedicated supporter of eEarth science education. He served as President of AGI, chaired the AGI Education Advisory Committee, and received both the Ian Campbell Medal and the Heroy Distinguished Service Award. In addition, he served as the Gertrude and Walter Pyron Distinguished Professor of Geology at Trinity University, as Dean of the Division of Sciences, Mathematics, and Engineering, and as Vice President for Academic Affairs. Roy was also appointed Chair of the Texas Earth Science Task Force by the Commissioner of the Texas Education Agency.

To learn more about competition requirements, application procedures, and deadlines, visit http://www.agiweb.org/education/awards/ed-roy/.

The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of 50 geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.

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